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Download full resolution image Chief Warrant Officer 3 Charles Eldridge (left), assigned to the 27th Infantry Combat Brigade Team assist Master Sgt. William Yohn of the 42nd Infantry Division install secure communications data

Warrant Officers Celebrated as Technical Experts

Happy Birthday to the U.S. Army Warrant Officer Corps! Warrant Officers trace their lineage to July 9, 1918 when Congress established the Army Mine Planter Service as part of the Coastal Artillery Corps. A total of 40 Warrant Officers were authorized to serve as masters, mates, chief engineers, and assistant engineers on each mine planting vessel in an Army War Department Bulletin less than two weeks later on July 22, 1918.

Although only one rank of Warrant Officer was authorized by Congress, in effect, three grades were created because of their varying levels of pay authorized for masters, 1st mates, 2nd mates, and marine engineer personnel.

The Army created the distinctive insignia of the Warrant Officer in May 1921.

The insignia of the Warrant Officer Corps consisted of an eagle rising with wings displayed, adapted from the great seal of the United States. The eagle is standing on two arrows, which symbolize the military arts and sciences for which Warrant Officers draw their specialties. Warrant Officers of the Army Tank Corps were the first to wear this new insignia.

Today’s Warrant Officers are the Army’s specialists in a variety of fields, including artillery, military intelligence, aviation, maintenance, medical, logistics and administration.

Pictured above, Chief Warrant Officer 3 Charles Eldridge (left), assigned to the 27th Infantry Combat Brigade Team assist Master Sgt. William Yohn of the 42nd Infantry Division install secure communications data into a vehicle radio in October 2011. Photo by Spc. James Roa.

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NY National Guard In the News

Times Union -- Thu, 12 Jul 2018 1918 casualty a notable son The casualty list released by the American Expeditionary Force on July 21, 1918 listed 64 American soldiers and marines killed in action and 28 missing.But the name reporters noticed first... (more)

Weather Channel -- Thu, 12 Jul 2018 Heres How You Land a Plane on Greenlands Ice Sheet How does a giant military plane take off and land on ice? Kait Parker goes to Greenlands ice sheet to find out.

Associated Press -- Thu, 12 Jul 2018 NYC soldier was Army division's 1st combat loss in WWI SARATOGA SPRINGS, N.Y. - A century ago this week, the New York National Guard's 27th Division lost its first soldier in combat in World War I.

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Dated: Tue, Jul 09, 2013 @ 15:45